1st International Workshop on Media fragment creation and reMIXing (MMIX’13)

at the 2013 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo (ICME 2013), San Jose, California, USA, July 15-19, 2013

LOGISTICS

Room: Valley
Date: 19 July 2013

AGENDA

  • 9:00-9:50 Welcome by workshop organisers, Keynote “Example-Based Remixing of Multimedia Contents” by Prof Noburo Babaguchi, Osaka University, Japan


Noboru Babaguchi received the B.E., M.E. and Ph.D. degrees in communication engineering from Osaka University, in 1979, 1981 and 1984, respectively. He is currently a Professor of the Department of Information and Communications Technology, Osaka University. From 1996 to 1997, he was a Visiting Scholar at the University of California, San Diego. His research interests include image/video analysis, multimedia computing and intelligent systems. He has published over 200 journal and conference papers and several textbooks. Dr. Babaguchi received Best Paper Award of 2006 Pacific-Rim Conference on Multimedia (PCM2006), and Fifth International Conference on Information Assurance and Security (IAS2009). He is on the editorial board of Multimedia Tools and Applications, Advances in Multimedia, and New Generation Computing. He served as a workshop Co-chair of 3rd International Workshop on Multimedia Information Retrieval (MIR2001), a Track Co-chair of 2006 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia & Expo (ICME2006), a General Co-chair of the 14th International MultiMedia Modeling Conference (MMM2008), a Sub-Track Chair (Image, video, and multimedia signal processing) of 2009 APSIPA Annual Summit and Conference (APSIPA ASC 2009), a General Co-Chair of ACM Multimedia 2012, a Track Co-Chair of 21st International Conference on Pattern Recognition, and an Area Chair of ICME2013. He also served on program committee of international conferences in multimedia related fields. He is a Fellow of IEICE, a Senior Member of IEEE, and a member of ACM, IPSJ, ITE and JSAI.

  • 9:50-10:00 Coffee Break
  • 10:00-12:00 Oral Presentations, Discussion & Close

PRESENTATIONS

STILL VISUALIZATION OF OBJECT MOTION IN COMPRESSED VIDEO
Sayed Hossein Khatoonabadi, Ivan Bajic

VIDEO CONCEPT DETECTION BY LEARNING FROM WEB IMAGES: A CASE STUDY ON CROSS DOMAIN LEARNING
Shiai Zhu, Ting Yao, Chong-Wah Ngo


ANALYSIS OF VISUAL SIMILARITY IN NEWS VIDEOS WITH ROBUST AND MEMORY-EFFICIENT IMAGE RETRIEVAL
David Chen, Peter Vajda, Sam Tsai, Maryam Daneshi, Matt Yu, Huizhong Chen, Andre Araujo, Bernd Girod


FAST OBJECT RE-DETECTION AND LOCALIZATION IN VIDEO FOR SPATIO-TEMPORAL FRAGMENT CREATION
Lampis Apostolidis, Vasileios Mezaris, Yiannis Kompatsiaris


TELL ME WHY! AIN’T NOTHIN’ BUT A MISTAKE? DESCRIBING MEDIA ITEM DIFFERENCES WITH MEDIA FRAGMENTS URI AND SPEECH SYNTHESIS
Thomas Steiner, Raphael Troncy


A FEATURE-ANALYSIS BASED FRAGMENT REMIX INSTRUMENT
Max Neupert, Joachim Gossmann


TOPICS OF INTEREST

While technologies for the manipulation of complete videos have been well-studied and are already used in relevant applications, e.g. in stock footage portals, media libraries or TV archives, where entire videos may be found and also purchased for re-use in new media production situations, these applications and markets do not permit the easy purchase or sale of smaller fragments of multimedia content. Making possible the latter would have significant benefits for both the creators and the potentials consumers of the content, most notably in terms of lowering the cost associated with re-using and re-mixing existing pieces of multimedia content towards creating new multimedia experiences. Besides benefits, though, the manipulation of multimedia content at such a finer granularity level also presents significant challenges, both purely technological (e.g. with respect to the automatic creation of meaningful media fragments, or the extraction of information that can describe such fragments and make them easily searchable) and more application-oriented ones (e.g. with respect to the required user interfaces, the use cases and even the business models associated with the re-use and re-mixing of media fragments).

This workshop aims to bring together researchers and practitioners from the different fields that contribute to the development of technologies and applications for media fragment creation and remixing, with emphasis both on the presentation of new supporting technologies for the creation and understanding of media fragments (e.g. video decomposition at different granularity levels; extraction of concepts, events, or textual descriptions that capture the meaning of specific media fragments) and on novel applications of such technologies for media fragment re-use and re- mixing in various domains, such as the traditional media industry, the news industry, video blogging and social media applications, and others. Specifically, topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Multimedia fragmentation techniques
  • Concept detection from media fragments
  • Event detection from media fragments
  • Event recounting and textual description of media fragments
  • Media fragment description
  • Media fragment search and retrieval
  • Media fragments in the social Web
  • User interfaces for media fragment manipulation
  • Novel media fragment re-use and remixing results with commercial application

We invite the submission of original work in these and related areas. The submissions should explicitly explain how they relate to the overall idea of media fragment creation and remixing. Each submission to the workshop will be peer-reviewed by at least three expert reviewers.

WORKSHOP ORGANIZERS

Important Dates

 

Workshop Paper Submission extended: March 14, 2013
Notification of Workshop Paper Acceptance: April 15, 2013
Camera-Ready Paper Due: April 30, 2013

 

Submissions

We encourage researchers from industry and academia to submit original works. Submitted manuscripts should be no longer than 6 pages, including all text, figures, and references. They must be formatted in standard IEEE camera-ready format (double-column, 10-pt font, letter (8.5×11-inch) paper) and must be submitted as PDF files.

Please note that reviewing is double blind, which means that authors do not know the names of the reviewers of their papers, and reviewers do not know the names of the authors. Information that could identify the authors in the paper (e.g. author names, acknowledgments to co-workers and grant IDs) and in any supplemental material (e.g., titles in the movies, or attached papers) must be avoided. Also remember to avoid providing links to websites that identify the authors.

Accepted papers MUST be presented at the workshop by one of the authors, or, if none of the authors are able to attend, by a qualified surrogate.

Further information for prospective authors (including Latex/Word templates and detailed instructions for preserving the anonymity of the submissions – same as those for the ICME main track submissions) can be found on the ICME web page.

The online submission system for ICME workshops is at https://cmt.research.microsoft.com/ICMEW2013

Program Committee members

  • Davy Van Deursen
  • Stephane Dupont
  • Rolf Fricke
  • Roberto Garcia
  • Nikolaos Gkalelis
  • Michiel Hildebrand
  • Ichiro Ide
  • Mitja Jermol
  • Yiannis Kompatsiaris
  • Erik Mannens
  • Tao Mei
  • Chong Wah Ngo
  • Johan Oomen
  • Silvia Pfeiffer
  • Panagiotis Sidiropoulos
  • Joakim Söderberg
  • Thomas Steiner
  • Raphaël Troncy

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